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Taste

Hello, apocalypters! I’m excited to announce that as a culminating event for The Apocalypse Project: Imagined Futures, The Mind Museum is collaborating with Radio Republic to bring you Future Feast, a celebration of human creativity and our hopes for a sustainable future. The event will be on July 26, Saturday, 12PM to 7PM at the Special Exhibition Hall of The Mind Museum.

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With the theme of Redesign, I am working with chefs who are creating new dishes for a Convenience Store of the Future. Radio Republic is bringing in their featured artists for July: Slow Hello, Jireh Calo, and Brisom. There will also be a performance by special guest artist Joey Ayala. This is an event for all ages, so bring in your families and get the kids to play at the Tinker Studio, watch spoken word performances and science shows, dress up in clothes from the Climate Change Closet and have your photos taken at the photo booth, smell the perfumes of The Ephemeral Marvels Perfume Store, participate in Mission Apocalypse Scavenger Hunt and win an Apocalypse Project Commander Badge, and think of how you can help build a sustainable future by making an Earth Pledge.

Future Feast poster by The Mind Museum, which highlights activities

Future Feast poster by The Mind Museum, which highlights activities

Future Feast poster by Radio Republic, highlighting featured artists, special guest artist, and the chefs

Future Feast poster by Radio Republic, highlighting featured artists, special guest artist, and the chefs

Ticket prices are as follows:

EXPLORE TICKET (All Day Pass to the galleries of TMM, Access to Live Performances, Mission Apocalypse Scavenger Hunt & Climate Change Closet): 500.00 PHP

TASTE TICKET (Access to Live Performances, Future Tastes (6 dishes), and Climate Change Closet): 300.00 PHP

DISCOVER TICKET (Access to Live Performances and Climate Change Closet): 200.00 PHP

TINKER TICKET (Access to Tinker Studio: Make your own Animal Art): 150.00 PHP

You can buy tickets online here. You can also buy your tickets at the museum on the day of the event. No reservations are required.

See you there!

 

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It’s been a while since I’ve updated. But that’s because there’s just so much to do and too little time to blog about it. But here’s a photograph of a worm steak by two of the seven chefs I’m collaborating with for another project for The Apocalypse Project. I ate it. I ate it all! It came with weeds and mashed sweet potato.

I’m pescetarian, so this was a gray area (fish eat worms no?), but I call it Designer’s Responsibility, as I like to think of the seven-year-olds I often encounter during my projects and would like to make sure this is ok for mass consumption. Take one for the team, or for humanity.

Worms! Weeds! Waste! Oh la la!

Worms! Weeds! Waste! Oh la la!

It was more of a mental challenge, as I kept thinking of the worms and kept telling myself it was just meat. And then I remembered I’m pescetarian and don’t eat meat. It was incredibly tasty, though, and Chef Erik told me it was 82% protein.

Verdict: Green light! I can’t wait for people to try it. That’s not even the craziest part. Stay tuned here or at http://www.apocalypse.cc for what’s next.

Here are some sneak peeks into the things I am working on for this residency.

I am reaching that point when my projects are deemed too crazy by people that I have to be the one to model it. The first photo is by the lovely Cheryl Song of the Singapore-ETH Future Cities Laboratory, who has patiently put up with me.

1 - Climate Change Couture - Catherine Young

2 - Climate Change Couture - Catherine Young 3 - Climate Change Couture - Catherine Young 4 - Earth vs Humans - Catherine Young

 

Follow the project site at http://www.apocalypse.cc.

Durian mooncake. I kid you not. This was a first for me, courtesy of the good people of the Future Cities Lab. It was actually quite good, even though I think durian deserves to be in a whole other food group by itself.

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Last night I was in Chinatown and right on cue, a small lantern parade began right outside the Buddhist temple, led by traditional lion and dragon dances.

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This was the second lion/dragon dance for me this year. (The first was the Lotus Lantern Festival in Seoul back in June.) I don’t think I’ll ever tire of these things. Happy Miid-Autumn Festival, one and all!

On the day I ate my way through Jeonju, chosen in 2012 as a Creative City for Gastronomy as part of UNESCO’s Creative Cities Network, I went past a store with teddy bears…

A teddy bear on a bench. Of course.

A teddy bear on a bench. Of course.

…the Gyeonggijeon Portrait Shrine with King Taejo’s portrait…

Image via Wikipiedia, since we weren't allowed to take photos of the actual portrait

Image via Wikipiedia, since we weren’t allowed to take photos of the actual portrait

…which made me wonder if his headpiece is the reason behind this Korean hat trend…

Devil hat. Or turkey hat, depending on how you look at it.

Devil hat. Or turkey hat, depending on how you look at it.

…and finally, oh finally, I made it to my bowl of Jeonju bibimbap.

Why, hello there, beautiful.

Why, hello there, beautiful.

Delish.

Omijacha, also known as “five-taste tea,” is a Korean tea made from the dried fruits of Schisandra chinensis, a berry native to China and Russia. It has that nickname because it has five tastes—sweet, sour, salty, bitter, and pungent. It is usually garnished with pine nuts.

Omijacha (five-taste tea)

Omijacha (five-taste tea)

The sensations caused by ingesting such a beverage with both opposing and complementary flavors are almost indescribable. It’s quite like drinking an entire universe in a cup. I could give up coffee for this. Really.

Thanks for the tip, HJP!