Archive

Tag Archives: hopscotch

DSC06562

Yesterday, I hiked Dobongsan, my final mountain in Seoul. I have hiked a total of 154 km (~77 miles) in 60 hours. (Perhaps this is extreme fatigue talking, but I think that cloud looks like the Ghostbusters logo, don’t you? Something to Rorsketch.) I’ve hiked all 43 mountains (and then some) of this city for a project called Seoul43. Today, I present it in our group exhibition, “Seoul Seoul Seoul” at The National Art Studio of Korea in Changdong.

DSC06581

On display is a multimedia interactive piece. The main parts are jars that contain soil samples from all the mountains I hiked, which were taken at the end of each hike at the bottom of the mountains. The table in the middle has shovels, mixing bowls, small outdoor plants, and other gardening equipment. Participants are invited to plant using any mixture of soil.  When they finish planting, they can place the paper cup containing the plant with the soil, now a mixture of soil from different mountains, on the shelves on the right. On the left is a video in both English and Korean that explains the project, and an iPad showing the website that contains more photos, information about the mountains, data from the hikes, etc.

Here is my friend Kate assembling the first plant, after helping me get the entire display finished in time for the opening:

DSC06599

After the exhibition, I will invite people to go to the mountains on individual scavenger hunts to return both soil and plant to the mountains, and to do fun tasks while at it.

Although I am grateful to have finished all the treks with no mishaps whatsoever, this piece is far from over. My next step is to continue with the website to add the data I have gathered during my hikes, which was recorded by the MyTracks app. I will also have to design the scavenger hunts and get enough people to participate in them.

But that’s it for now. Our opening is in two hours, and tomorrow I plan on going to a jimjilbang (Korean sauna). Because dang it, my feet are killing me.

Oh, and I made another hopscotch board for the Mondrian Hopscotch series, this time with a Korean twist (the X in the middle is how they create their boards here):

DSC06595

The link to the Seoul43 site is here.

Mondrian Hopscotch I

Mondrian Hopscotch I

Child’s Play: Mondrian Hopscotch I
April 2013
installation
140 x 300 inches (3.6 x 7.6 meters)
tape

Can we play with art? In this piece, I explore this idea by creating a hopscotch board using the aesthetic of Piet Mondrian, one of my favorite painters. The primary intention was similar to The Grid, in that I wanted the participant to create his own interaction with it. The secondary intention was to use a well known art aesthetic and extend the idea of “viewing” the art (such as one would do with an actual painting of Mondrian’s), and instead be required to touch it (or jump on it) to have the experience.

The material I used was tape. It was a decision based on utility—since people will be jumping on it, I needed a material that can withstand all the footsteps. It was also a decision based on culture; in Korea, Mondrian’s aesthetic reminds me of the stripes on Korean hanbok, and looking closely, each square is made of several tape “stripes.”

DSC03500

DSC03501

 

DSC04083

I am intrigued by the idea of having the audience be a part of the art to complete the piece, not unlike most of new media art, but here, using the cheapest of materials.

DSC04009

DSC03996

Here is a short video showing a person interacting with it.

I used it for a talk/workshop with some children here at the National Art Studio of Korea, and invited them to interact with the work, too.

DSC04026

DSC04042

last

 

Many thanks to Ms. Ju-Eun Lee of Changdong Elementary School, their awesome students (special thanks to Anna Lee for participating in the video and still shots), and to the staff of The National Art Studio of Korea who assisted with organization and translation.