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Hello, apocalypters! I’m excited to announce that as a culminating event for The Apocalypse Project: Imagined Futures, The Mind Museum is collaborating with Radio Republic to bring you Future Feast, a celebration of human creativity and our hopes for a sustainable future. The event will be on July 26, Saturday, 12PM to 7PM at the Special Exhibition Hall of The Mind Museum.

FutureFeastTMMposter-01

With the theme of Redesign, I am working with chefs who are creating new dishes for a Convenience Store of the Future. Radio Republic is bringing in their featured artists for July: Slow Hello, Jireh Calo, and Brisom. There will also be a performance by special guest artist Joey Ayala. This is an event for all ages, so bring in your families and get the kids to play at the Tinker Studio, watch spoken word performances and science shows, dress up in clothes from the Climate Change Closet and have your photos taken at the photo booth, smell the perfumes of The Ephemeral Marvels Perfume Store, participate in Mission Apocalypse Scavenger Hunt and win an Apocalypse Project Commander Badge, and think of how you can help build a sustainable future by making an Earth Pledge.

Future Feast poster by The Mind Museum, which highlights activities

Future Feast poster by The Mind Museum, which highlights activities

Future Feast poster by Radio Republic, highlighting featured artists, special guest artist, and the chefs

Future Feast poster by Radio Republic, highlighting featured artists, special guest artist, and the chefs

Ticket prices are as follows:

EXPLORE TICKET (All Day Pass to the galleries of TMM, Access to Live Performances, Mission Apocalypse Scavenger Hunt & Climate Change Closet): 500.00 PHP

TASTE TICKET (Access to Live Performances, Future Tastes (6 dishes), and Climate Change Closet): 300.00 PHP

DISCOVER TICKET (Access to Live Performances and Climate Change Closet): 200.00 PHP

TINKER TICKET (Access to Tinker Studio: Make your own Animal Art): 150.00 PHP

You can buy tickets online here. You can also buy your tickets at the museum on the day of the event. No reservations are required.

See you there!

 

While researching for my residency project on climate change, I came across a dialogue between Emma Maris, environmental writer and reporter,  and Erle Ellis, Professor of Geography and Environmental Systems, in which they discuss a very thought-provoking question, “Is the Anthropocene…Beautiful?”

Because of the apocalyptic nature of my project, when I think of the Anthropocene, it’s hard not to be a curmudgeon. It’s hard not to dislike our species. But on the other hand, there is no question that our species can make beautiful things, although I suppose the notion of beauty is subjective.

I think back on Seoul43, which is the project that made me want to do this, my first intentionally environmental project. I remember the ones with physical evidence of Korea’s history—the eunuch cemetery, the fortress, the centuries-old temple. But these are human interventions that are seen through rose-colored glasses because of their age. As one who hiked past them all, I found it interesting to trek through these unwitting museums of a country’s past. If they were to be built today, perhaps they will be met with resistance. But because they are relics from the past, they are instead seen as something to be preserved. From personal experience, I found the centuries-old fortress on one mountain to be charming, but the modern apartment building on another to be jarring—the former contributed to my experience while the latter hindered it. I wonder if, centuries from now, if someone from the future encounters this present-day apartment and sees it as a relic of architecture?

Watch the video below: