A Glass of the Sea: An Exhibition about the Coral Triangle at The Mind Museum

For the past few months, I have been involved with a project by The Mind Museum, called A Glass of the Sea (AGoS), an exhibition about the Coral Triangle. Scientists from the California Academy of Sciences have been exploring the Verde Island Passage of the CT and have been discovering an abundance of new species. The Verde Island Passage may well be the apex of marine biodiversity on the planet. How amazing!

The AGoS team was led by The Mind Museum curator Maribel Garcia, Bryant Cabantac, Cris Mora, Carlie Dario, Dem Bitantes, Awesome Lab, and myself. The exhibition is made possible by a grant from USAID.

I did the graphic design of the exhibition. I was inspired by kimono fabrics on my visit in Japan, especially their vibrant and classy colors. We applied this to priming tunnels that are shaped like Asian folding fans as well as English and Filipino signage throughout the exhibition.

Welcome to A Glass of the Sea!

Welcome to A Glass of the Sea!

Enter the waves...

Enter the waves…

You haven’t lived until you’ve done graphic designs of bilingual translations about science. For real. Here’s a fun shot of Darwin and I during installation, while we wrestled with industrial strength velcro.

I did the visual design and Darwin Cayetano did the Filipino translations.

I did the visual design and Darwin Cayetano did the Filipino translations.

In “A Story of the Science of the Sea”, visitors are invited to take a wooden sculpture etched with a sea creature on top, and place it on an NFC reader to watch it come to life on screen. Audio narration gives more information about the creature. This was designed by Cris Mora.

You can choose a  wooden sculpture and put them on an NFC reader to know more about the creature. Video footage provided by California Academy of Sciences.

You can choose a wooden sculpture and put them on an NFC reader to know more about the creature. Video footage provided by California Academy of Sciences.

We also made specially designed video games that each highlight one problem in our oceans. I designed the games while the awesome people at Awesome Labs programmed them.

One game is Garbage Catch, where the user has to prevent garbage from reaching the ocean floor.

You can catch garbage before they fall onto the ocean floor and hurt sea creatures!

You can catch garbage before they fall onto the ocean floor and hurt sea creatures!

A visitor plays Garbage Catch.

A visitor plays Garbage Catch.

Another game is Net Escape, where you prevent unsustainable seafood from swimming into a large net.

Net Escape is a game where you prevent unsustainable seafood from swimming into a large net.

Net Escape is a game where you prevent unsustainable seafood from swimming into a large net.

A visitor plays Net Escape

A visitor plays Net Escape

The last game is Sustainable Seafood Market, where users are given two seafood options at a time. They must pick the sustainable over the unsustainable seafood. This was the toughest game for me to design, but it’s my favorite among the three. We initially called this Sushi Tinder (which is way catchier). I dedicate this to the chick I met who said she eats shark’s fin soup in weddings because “it’s already there”. RAGE.

Sustainable Seafood Market is a game where visitors have to pick the sustainable over the unsustainable seafood.

Sustainable Seafood Market is a game where visitors have to pick the sustainable over the unsustainable seafood.

After each game, the user can make a pledge to take care of the ocean. The pledges are all different and specific, such as “I pledge not to eat or buy shark’s fin soup from restaurants.”

You can pledge to take care of the ocean and have your photo taken by raising your arms like a starfish.

You can pledge to take care of the ocean and have your photo taken by raising your arms like a starfish.

Your Role in Sea Life highlights your impact on the ocean. Cris Mora made these amazing shadow sculptures out of garbage, showing an impaled turtle (one of the many species that suffer because of what mankind is doing to the oceans), cities which contribute to ocean problems, and the earth in the palm of a hand.

Shadow sculptures made of garbage made by Cris Mora

Shadow sculptures made of garbage made by Cris Mora

AGoS is made of primarily sustainable materials, such as the bamboo framework that houses the exhibition.

A Glass of the Sea features a sustainable bamboo frame.

A Glass of the Sea features a sustainable bamboo frame.

It also features an education space entitled “Ocean in Motion” where visitors can make their own sea creatures, learn about marine protected areas, etc.

Here is our education space where visitors can make their own sea creatures, learn about marine protected areas, etc.

Here is our education space where visitors can make their own sea creatures, learn about marine protected areas, etc.

We launched this yesterday, July 16, at The Mind Museum. The exhibition will stay there until October and then will get to travel all over the Philippines. Hurray!

The core team of A Glass of the Sea: Bryant Cabantac, Cris Mora, Maribel Garcia, Carlie Dario, Catherine Young, Darwin Cayetano. Not in the photo: Dem Bitantes and Walter Wong.

The core team of A Glass of the Sea: Bryant Cabantac, Cris Mora, Maribel Garcia, Carlie Dario, Catherine Young, Darwin Cayetano. Not in the photo: Dem Bitantes and Walter Wong.

Thanks for coming, Mom!

Thanks for coming, Mom! <3

Thanks for coming, Mom! ❤

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